A Little Lesson in Latin

(This passage comes from my upcoming book of essays, “Impossible is an Illusion” which will be published by Ravenswood Publishers in May 2017.)

There is a Latin phrase that reads, “Crede quod habes, et habes.” 

This can be translated as, “Believe that you have it, and you have it.” 

As we look to find ways to (continually) improve student performance, the key might be in that little Latin phrase.

“Believe that you can do it.”

I have always found that by telling people they can do things, they have found that they can… do things.  It’s a pretty simple formula.  When you think you can, you can.  Confidence and belief are strong motivators.

I know when people have believed in me, I have often tried very hard to make their belief a reality.  Most often I have rewarded their belief by achieving what they thought was possible, which was not necessarily what I thought was possible.

As I think of many of my life’s “accomplishments,” each time there was a person, or people, that said, “Paul, you can do it.”  These encouragers made me believe in myself. 

Today, when I have self doubt about being able to accomplish a task, I think about the faith others have in me.  This often leads me to say to myself, “You can do it.”  And I usually do!

Next fall, I’ll be struggling on the streets of New York City as I run the New York City Marathon.  There is something glorious, magical, wonderful (and horrible, painful, upsetting, and ugly) about struggling through the New York City Marathon.  I will be ready for the race, but throughout the long training process I often have to tell myself, “You can do it.”  Along with this, I have family members and friends who encourage me in times of doubt.  And don’t be fooled, no matter how good my training, no matter how prepared I might be, there are always periods of doubt.

I have participated in many races and have been a spectator at many others.  You might be surprised but an encouraging word, even from a stranger, such as,  “YOU CAN DO IT!” or “YOU LOOK GREAT” or “I BELIEVE IN YOU” can have an amazing impact on a runner’s state of mind – even when he is in the depth of misery.  Words like that have helped me find something deep inside and push through the disbelief in myself.

BELIEVE THAT YOU HAVE IT, AND YOU HAVE IT.

Could it be possible that these nine English words (or six Latin words) hold the ultimate key to success?

If strangers can impact on a runner’s performance (and I know that this helps many, not just me), imagine the impact of a child’s teacher?  We have said, often, that the teacher is one of the biggest influencers in a child’s life.  Our words are powerful.  Our actions speak volumes.

Imagine then, the power of these words spoken to individuals and groups:

BELIEVE YOU CAN DO IT, AND YOU CAN DO IT.

In 1973, the New York Mets had a remarkable pennant run that was inspired, in part, from the words of pitcher Tug McGraw.  He said simply, “Ya Gotta Believe.”

The Mets did believe – and they took that belief all the way to the World Series against the longest of odds. 

As we create ignition for children, as we inspire them to learn, as we motivate them, we must remember to continually tell them:

“YOU CAN DO IT!”

Then, take it even one step further.  Tell them not just that they can do it, but, tell them

“I BELIEVE YOU CAN DO IT,” and “I BELIEVE IN YOU.”

Those just might be the most powerful words any person can tell another person. 

“I believe in you.”

When we tell our students that we believe in them, they will believe us and believe in themselves.  They will give that extra effort.  They will rise above their own fears or skepticism. 

The results will be spectacular!

Birthdays

January 21 will be here soon.  It’s a big day for some people.  Many famous people were born on January 21. 

These include:

Charles V, King of France, born on January 21, in 1338

Ethan Allen, a famous American general, in 1738

John C. Fremont, “The Pathfinder,” in 1813

Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, the Confederate General, in 1824

Christian Dior, fashion designer, in 1905 Continue reading “Birthdays”

A Bolt…

I will begin this post by stating an obvious point:

             Usain Bolt is an amazing sprinter.

As a runner who (more and more) plods through training runs and marathons, I am in awe of Usain Bolt’s speed, grace, and magnificence.

Continue reading “A Bolt…”

A Special Teacher! – Conclusion

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this series, I shared direct feedback, in the actual words of students, regarding the characteristics that compelled them to nominate individual teachers for a Teacher of the Week program that I experimented with about ten years ago.

It is my contention that we can learn the most about what matters in the classroom by taking the time to listen to students – and by valuing their feedback.  Students live in the world of today.  Their time is now.  What takes place in the classroom on a daily basis impacts them directly.  Students know what good teachers look like.  We just have to take the time to listen.

Continue reading “A Special Teacher! – Conclusion”