Day 1 – AGAIN?!

On November 10, I started my comeback.  I was ready.  I was fired up.  I was focused.

I was still injured.

I just didn’t want to admit it.

I figured that I’d take it slowly and that I’d build up the mileage over time.  The plan did make sense.  It really did.  Except for one fact, I was still injured.  I had torn my Achilles a while back.  (I really don’t know when.  Pain has been a part of my running for a long time now.  I probably tweaked the tendon and just ran and ran on it making it worse and worse.  Who knows?)

I ran one mile on that November day and felt good enough.  Two days later, I ran one mile again.  The next day, I ran two.  (For a marathoner, like me, this is taking it VERY slowly.)

I then needed four days off before running two miles on back-to-back days (November 18 and 19).  This was slow, but steady progress.  After three more days off, I covered my first three miler.  Two days later, I did back-to-back days of two miles again.  

I was being smart.  I stretched.  I took a lot of off days.  I didn’t run fast.  Moderation was the key.  

But I was still injured.  After a one mile run on November 29, I shut it down again.

In between runs, I was hobbling all over the place.  

Today, two and a half weeks after I stopped, I just ran one mile.  I’m now icing my Achilles.  But… it doesn’t hurt.  I visited my great chiropractor/sports injury doctor (Dr. Alfonse DeMaria) four times in the last few weeks.  He is a miracle worker.  I had felt pretty good for almost a week, so I figured I’d try one mile today and see what happens.

So far, all seems good.

The first step of my (new) comeback seems successful.  

I just hope this isn’t another false start.

I have a few marathons to run in 2018 and I need to get going!

 

 

 

 

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Schulz and Success

I just finished reading,  Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography (by David Michaelis) an excellent book that provided an in-depth look at Charles Schulz, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip and franchise.  Schulz’s life was fascinating.  He was successful beyond his wildest dreams.  His characters became household names.  His sayings have been quotes by millions.  In many ways, Charlie Brown, Lucy, Schroeder, Linus, Sally, and Snoopy defined America in the second half of the 20th Century.

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Insignificant?

I think, in a way, we are very spoiled.  The world is at our fingertips.  We can see amazing things whenever we want.  Some of the amazing things we see are real, some of them might even be staged (“reality TV”), but, nonetheless, in the moment at least, what we are watching seems real, amazing, other worldly, and significant. 

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Day #1

 I have run a countless number of races in my life.  Yes, this includes 20 marathons.  (I always keep an accurate count of my marathons.)

I love to run.

I have often stated that the marathon defines me. 

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Saying Goodbye to Matsui & Meb

(This post can also be found on NYY_Report (“Start Spreading the News”):

http://itsaboutthemoney.net/start-spreading-the-news/2017/11/6/saying-goodbye-to-matsui-and-meb)

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We are sports fans.  There is something special and wonderful and unique about being a sports fan.  We love our teams and certain players.  We get excited by special moments.

 And when disappointment hits, it hits hard – and it often hurts. 

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No Marathon 2017

It has been the strangest autumn of my life.  Or, at least the strangest autumn of the last fifteen years – since 2002.

I’ve shared on these pages before that I’m not running a fall marathon this year.

It’s an unfamiliar feeling.  And I don’t particularly like it.  The beloved New York City Marathon, the race I love and adore, will go on without me.

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A Shining Light

(Author’s note – I changed the names of the student in this true story.)

Way back, a long time ago, when I was a teacher, I had a student named Beth.  One day in class, during a discussion about Pre-Columbian America, Beth shared that she was of Native American decent.  That prompted me to bestow a nickname on her.  (I gave happy nicknames to lots of kids.)  From that day forward Beth was “A Shining Light in the Sky.”  Beth loved the nickname.  She came to class every day with a warm smile.

Beth was one of those kids who was easy to like as a teacher:  She was happy, enthusiastic, a hard worker, and team player.  A model student, Beth was the type of kid who makes teaching a joy.

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Sometimes You Can’t?

Sometimes we can’t accomplish what we set our minds to do.

Sometimes impossible isn’t an illusion… it is real.  Or, at least it seems real.  We strive, we reach, we try – and we fall short, we stumble, we fall.  We reach and try again.  And fall and fail.  We fall and fail and fail again.  Or so it seems…

Sometimes the goal, whatever it is, seems too hard, too distant, too impossible.  We say, “I can’t.”  We say, “It’ll never happen.”  

What then?

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The Judge

(The following passage was included as part of the monthly newsletter that I send out to the parents of my school community.)

It is no secret that I enjoy sports, mostly baseball, and that I have always been a big fan of the New York Yankees.  There is something about baseball that resonates with me.  The ebb and flow of the game, the simplicity, the day-to-day consistency…  Like a good friend, from April through September, baseball is a constant companion.  I love it.

One of the big stories that has come out of this year’s baseball season has been the fact that a rookie on the New York Yankees, a certain Aaron Judge, recently set the record for the most home runs ever hit in one’s first season.  No player had ever hit 50 home runs as a rookie until Aaron Judge accomplished that feat.  Amazing.

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Limits

Often times we say, “I can’t do that” or “I’m not good at that.”  (I am as guilty of this as anyone.  There’s a lot I sometimes believe I can’t do.)

When we say the words, “I can’t,” we are limiting ourselves.  As a result, I believe that some of the most damaging words in our language are “I can’t.” 

When we say we can’t, we make our own lives poorer – not richer.  When we say we can’t, we eliminate the possibilities and the learning that comes with and from new experiences.  When we say we can’t, our world becomes smaller, our interests become fewer, and we deprive ourselves of the opportunity to learn more about ourselves.

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